Currently, I am working for the William Blake Archive, a site that offers access to thousands of Blake's works. At the moment, I am working on a transcription of The Four Zoas, a work that features multiple layers of revision. I am attempting to create an interface that will allow users to witness these sites of revision, while also maximizing readability.The site can be found at:

http://www.blakearchive.org

I am also working for The Camelot Project, which features a database of Arthurian texts, images, and bibliographies. The project can be found at:

http://www.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/

The site for my fellowship research on the connections between speech and gender in Russian fairy tales can be found at:

http://ft.obdurodon.org

Some much smaller projects include:

http://gk.obdurodon.org/Blake.html

http://gk.obdurodon.org/Dickinson.html

I have recently become interested in the philosophy of markup and wrote a paper on the topic for a seminar class, Digital Representations of the Book. I am continuing to work on the paper, which can be found at:

http://gk.obdurodon.org/seminar/seminarPaper.xhtml

To jump directly to a digital transcription of a chapter from Mark Danielewski's novel, House of Leaves, (which is part of the aforementioned paper) go to:

http://gk.obdurodon.org/seminar/leavesHome.xhtml

The class for which I was a teaching assistant, Computational Methods in the Humanities, has a website which can be found at:

http://dh.obdurodon.org/

I recently coauthored a blog post about teaching digital humanities. The post was written as a response to a NITLE digital scholarship seminar, “Teaching DH 101: Introduction to the Digital Humanities.”

http://blogs.nitle.org/2012/01/31/can-humanities-undergrads-learn-to-code/